Basic Concussion Information

“Concussion Management.” Concussion Overview: Signs, Symptoms, Assessment, Management Guidelines, Recommendations, Treatment, Recovery. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Nov. 2012.

A concussion is defined as: disturbance in brain function that occurs following either a blow to the head or as a result of the violent shaking of the head. It is estimated that 300,000 annual incidences sports-related concussion happen. It is also estimated that when a child is in a full contact sport and in their season that they have a 19% chance of getting a concussion. Concussions are drastically changing the way people think about full contact sports and are making people more aware.

When an athlete gets a concussion common symptoms reported by athletes are headaches, nausea, balance problems, dizziness, and much much. Most athletes do recover from their concussion, but sometimes they can experience lasting effects like sensitivity to light, sleeping difficulties, fatigue, chronic headaches and much more. These lasting effects are often refereed to as “Post Concussion Syndrome.” Often making this very difficult to allow an athlete to continue their sport. The best thing you can do if you think the player or yourself has a concussion is to remove the athlete our of the game and doesn’t return and is then medically evaluated by a doctor.

Being in a full contact sport I am fully aware of how serious a concussion can be and come to. I have seen players quit their sport because of how much damage they have done to their head and hopefully don’t have to come to this one day. I felt that this article did a good job on telling all the facts about concussions. It tells you symptoms, what to do if you get one in a game, and even the lasting effect a concussion can have on you. After reading this article and reflecting upon it I don’t want people to be afraid to play a full contact sport. The point is to make sure people are aware and to be informed.

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